Non-Inflammatory Acne - Symptoms

Acne is a skin condition that affects millions of people globally. Although the long-term skin problem isn’t considered as a health hazard, it can cause serious physical and mental effects which include low self-esteem. A common type of acne that’s experienced by most people is non-inflammatory and this article provides a detailed overview.

Table of Contents

  1. What is Non-Inflammatory Acne?
  2. Types of Non-Inflamed Acne
  3. Main Causes of the Non-Inflammatory Acne
  4. Non-Inflammatory Acne: Symptoms
  5. Non-Inflammatory Acne: Available Treatment Options
  6. Non-Inflammatory Acne: Home Remedies & Prevention
  7. The Difference Between Inflammatory and Non-Inflammatory

What is Non-Inflammatory Acne?

It’s the most common type of acne which mainly consists of blackheads and whiteheads. Non-inflammatory acne also known as the comedonal type of acne. It’s for this reason that the black and whiteheads are sometimes called the closed and open comedones.

Types of Non-Inflamed Acne

This type of acne doesn’t produce lesion swellings or redness. The non-inflamed acne usually turns into a normal pimple incase its invaded by the bacteria.  The main types of non-inflamed acne are:

  • Blackheads and
  • Whiteheads

Main Causes of the Non-Inflammatory Acne

The main cause of this type of acne is hormonal changes. When your hormones keep on fluctuating, there are high chances that your skin will be susceptible to acne. Stress and an unhealthy diet are also great influencers. Additionally, a change in the environment can lead to non-inflammatory acne. All these can cause the skin pores to get clogged with oily secretions and dead cells.

 

Non-Inflammatory Acne: Symptoms

This skin problem is normally accompanied by occasional breakouts which can be mild or severe. The symptoms vary depending on the type of acne. For instance, blackheads are characterized by a dark color under the skin and open pores that are plugged while whiteheads have tiny bumps with the white color underneath the skin with closed pores.

Non-Inflammatory Acne - Symptoms

Non-Inflammatory Acne: Available Treatment Options

The type of treatment option that will be used depends if the non-inflammation is a blackhead or a white head. Additionally, its severity will also be considered. Is it mild, moderate or severe? Topical retinoid are mostly used if the condition is mild. In case it’s severe or moderate, your doctor will prescribe oral antibiotics as well as topical in addition to benzoyl peroxide. This formula will reduce the resistance that’s caused by the bacteria and eliminate the white or blackheads.

Non-Inflammatory Acne: Home Remedies & Prevention

Non-inflammatory acne can be treated from home using home-based remedies.  Most of these remedies are full of anti-inflammatories and antioxidants which help to fight bacterial infections and nourish the skin. Some of the most effective home remedies include:

  • Applying apple cider vinegar on the affected area. This liquid has the ability to fight off viruses and bacteria.
  • Honey and cinnamon face mask. This combination is rich in antioxidants which are even more effective than retinoids or benzoyl peroxide thanks to their anti-bacterial properties.
  • Application of green tea. This herbal-based product is rich in antioxidants and it promotes good skin health.
  • Aloe Vera: it’s a tropical plant which has moisturizing effects. The gel helps to heal scars and nourish the skin cells.

Acne Prevention

In order to prevent non-inflammatory acne, it’s important to exfoliate regularly. This helps to remove the layer of dead cells which are found on top of the skin. You can exfoliate manually using a scrub or a soft brush to physically get rid of the dead cells. Exfoliation can also be dome chemically using certain types of acids which can dissolve the dead cells.

Besides that, a low glycemic diet is also good if you have acne prone skin. There has been an on-going debate about the relationship between acne and diet. The truth is whatever you eat has a direct impact on your skin. Research reports show that foods that are rich in sugar usually promote the development of acne. Foods which have high glycemic index have lots of sugar and they can easily raise the level of blood sugar. This causes an insulin spike which leads to an increase in the production of sebum. The higher the production of sebum, the higher your chances of developing acne. These foods include soft drinks that are rich in sugar, pastries, white bread, sugary cereals, doughnuts, candies as well as other types of processed foods. Instead make sure that your diet is rich in whole grains, legumes, vegetables, nuts, and fruits.

There has been a controversial relationship between acne and dairy products. Dairy usually causes hormonal changes and it may lead to the development of acne. To be on the safe side, cut your daily intake. Lastly, ensure that you reduce stress by meditating, engaging in workouts, and getting more sleep.

The Difference Between Inflammatory Acne & Non-Inflammatory Acne

Note that acne is normally divided into two categories, inflammatory and the non-inflammatory type. This all depends on how they affect the skin and the eruptions they cause. Non-inflammatory is the most common type and it’s either a blackhead or a white head. Non-inflammatory acne can have blocked or open skin pore. Inflammatory acne, on the other hand, contains clogged skin pores which are normally infected with bacteria. It can turn into papules which are pus-free pimples or pustules which are pus-filled pimples. Besides those, it can turn to cysts which are known as inflammatory nodules. Inflamed acne usually contains bacteria and the affected area sometimes swells or reddens.

Final Thoughts

From the detailed overview of acne, it’s worth noting that non-inflammatory acne is usually mild hence it can be treated using home-based remedies and sometimes prescription drugs.  It’s a manageable skin condition that can be controlled with a proper diet, physical exercises, and a proper skin care routine such as exfoliation.

Sources

  • https://www.healthline.com/health/beauty-skin-care/types-of-acne
  • https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/12233-acne
  • https://www.girlshealth.gov/body/grooming/acne.html
  • https://uhs.umich.edu/acne